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Eonline.com The guy whose mouth could give Ari Gold's a run for its money has been silenced. Veteran character actor Maury Chaykin, who had memorable roles in such films as Dances With Wolves, A Life Less Ordinary and Mystery, Alaska but was arguably best known for his Harvey Weinstein parody in HBO's Entourage, died Tuesday—on his 61st birthday. Chaykin, who had been battling a kidney ailment, passed away at a Toronto hospital surrounded by his family. Clips of his work: Edited by princess

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1959: Elizabeth Taylor with Eddie Fisher before their marriage.




Eddie Fisher Dies at 82
By Alison Schwartz
Friday September 24, 2010 08:00 AM EDT
people.com

After suffering complications from recent hip surgery, 1950s pop icon Eddie Fisher passed away at the age of 82.

"Late [Wednesday] evening, the world lost a true American icon," Fisher's family said in a statement. "He was an extraordinary talent and a true mensch." Father to Star Wars actress Carrie Fisher, he died in his home in Berkeley, Calif. The statement also read: "He was loved and will be missed by his four children: Carrie, Todd, Joely, and Tricia Leigh as well as his six grandchildren."

The late Fisher was one of the most successful pop voices of the 1950s, with chart-toppers like "I Need You Now," "Wish You Were Here" and "I'm Walking Behind You." Besides making waves on the radio, he had his own TV series, Coke Time with Eddie Fisher and The Eddie Fisher Show.

He continued to record music into the 1960s, although his pop appeal and following of teenage devotees faded with the birth of rock 'n' roll.

And his personal life made just as many headlines as his music career: Fisher was married five times, including his famous romancing of Elizabeth Taylor. Fisher left his first wife, singer-actress Debbie Reynolds (with whom he had two children with, including Carrie) for Taylor, which daughter Carrie compared to the modern-day "Brangelina" saga.

He also married actress Connie Stevens (with whom he had two more children) when he was 39 and 21-year-old beauty queen Terry Richard when he was 47. He later married Chinese-born businesswoman Betty Lin in 1993, his fifth and longest marriage. Lin died in 2001.

His relationship with Carrie, 53, may have been rocky when she was growing up, but the two reconciled before his death.

On Friday morning, the actress shared the news of her father's death on Twitter. "My Puff Daddy passed away Wednesday night due to complications following his hip surgery," she Tweeted. "He was an extraordinary talent and a true mensch."

In August, she spoke to journalists about their mended relationship, as well.

"I saw him more on TV than in the planet," she said at a TV Critics Association Summer Press Tour. "But I have a great relationship with him today."

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Tony Curtis has passed away at age 85 I don't know how to post a picture here but I was a great fan of Tony Curtis. I adored him in the story of Houdini, I think it was one of the earliest movies I remember when I cried at the ending.

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Tony Curtis has passed away at age 85
I don't know how to post a picture here but I was a great fan of Tony Curtis. I adored him in the story of Houdini, I think it was one of the earliest movies I remember when I cried at the ending.


I loved that movie!

You know, I always got him and Eddie Fisher confused, no doubt because they both had famous daughters. Odd that they died so close together.

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You know, I always got him and Eddie Fisher confused, no doubt because they both had famous daughters. Odd that they died so close together.



All day long I have been trying to tell my husband that I read his obituary earlier in the week. That there was even a quote from his actress daughter about how they finally grew closer when she was older. I was POSITIVE I was right. It wasn't until just now when I read this thread that I realized the mistake I made. And apparently I am not the only one with this issue!

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Barbara Billingsley, who gained supermom status for her gentle portrayal of June Cleaver, the warm, supportive mother of a pair of precocious boys in "Leave it to Beaver," died Saturday. She was 94. Ms. Billingsley, who had suffered from a rheumatoid disease, died at her home in Santa Monica, said family spokeswoman Judy Twersky. When the show debuted in 1957, Jerry Mathers, who played Beaver, was 9, and Tony Dow, who portrayed Wally, was 12. Ms. Billingsley's character, the perfect stay-at-home 1950s mom, was always there to gently but firmly nurture both through the ups and downs of childhood. Beaver, meanwhile, was a typical American boy whose adventures landed him in one comical crisis after another. Ms. Billingsley's own two sons said she was pretty much the image of June Cleaver in real life, although the actress disagreed. "She was every bit as nurturing, classy, and lovely as "June Cleaver" and we were so proud to share her with the world," her son Glenn Billingsley said Saturday. She did acknowledge that she may have become more like June as the series progressed. "I think what happens is that the writers start writing about you as well as the character they created," she once said. "So you become sort of all mixed up, I think." A wholesome beauty with a lithe figure, Ms. Billingsley began acting in her elementary school's plays and soon discovered she wanted to do nothing else. Although her beauty and figure won her numerous roles in movies from the mid-1940s to the mid-1950s, she failed to obtain star status until "Leave it to Beaver," a show that she almost passed on. "I was going to do another series with Buddy Ebsen for the same producers, but somehow it didn't materialize," she told The Associated Press in 1994. "A couple of months later I got a call to go to the studio to do this pilot show. And it was 'Beaver.'" Decades later, she expressed surprise at the lasting affection people had for the show. "We knew we were making a good show, because it was so well written," she said. "But we had no idea what was ahead. People still talk about it and write letters, telling how much they watch it today with their children and grandchildren." After "Leave it to Beaver" left the air in 1963 Ms. Billingsley largely disappeared from public view for several years. She resurfaced in 1980 in a hilarious cameo in "Airplane!" playing a demur elderly passenger not unlike June Cleaver. When flight attendants were unable to communicate with a pair of jive-talking hipsters, Ms. Billingsley's character volunteered to translate, saying "I speak jive." The three then engage in a raucous street-slang conversation. "No chance they would have cast me for that if I hadn't been June Cleaver," she once said. She returned as June Cleaver in a 1983 TV movie, "Still the Beaver," that costarred Mr. Mathers and Mr. Dow and portrayed a much darker side of Beaver's life. In his mid-30s, Beaver was unemployed, unable to communicate with his own sons and going through a divorce. Wally, a successful lawyer, was handling the divorce, and June was at a loss to help her son through the transition. "Ward, what would you do?" she asked at the site of her husband's grave. (Hugh Beaumont, who played Ward Cleaver, had died in 1982.) The movie revived interest in the Cleaver family, and the Disney Channel launched "The New Leave It to Beaver" in 1985. The series took a more hopeful view of the Cleavers, with Beaver winning custody of his two sons and all three moving in with June. In 1997 Universal made a "Leave it to Beaver" theatrical film with a new generation of actors. Ms. Billingsley returned for a cameo, however, as Aunt Martha. "America's favorite mother is now gone," Mr. Dow said in a statement Saturday. "I feel very fortunate to have been her "son" for 11 years. We were wonderful friends and I will miss her very much." In later years she appeared from time to time in such TV series as "Murphy Brown," "Empty Nest" and "Baby Boom" and had a memorable comic turn opposite fellow TV moms June Lockhart of "Lassie" and Isabel Sanford of "The Jeffersons' on the "Roseanne" show. "Now some people, they just associate you with that one role (June Cleaver), and it makes it hard to do other things," she once said. "But as far as I'm concerned, it's been an honor." In real life, fate was not as gentle to Ms. Billingsley as it had been to June and her family. Born Barbara Lillian Combes in Los Angeles on Dec. 22, 1915, she was raised by her mother after her parents divorced. She and her first husband, Glenn Billingsley, divorced when her sons were just 2 and 4. Her second husband, director Roy Kellino, died of a heart attack after three years of marriage and just months before she landed the "Leave it to Beaver" role. She married physician Bill Mortenson in 1959 and they remained wed until his death in 1981. Ms. Twersky said Ms. Billingsley's survivors include her sons, a stepson and numerous grandchildren. —Copyright Associated Press 2010

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Happy Days tv dad Tom Bosley has died at age 83. Tom Bosley has passed away at the age of 83 in his Palm Springs California home from complications of a staph infection. Tom Bosley first started his acting career in 1963 when he co starred with screen beauty Natalie Wood in the classic film "Love With A Proper Stranger." Tom Bosely is best known as his long running role as Howard Cunningham on the comedy show 'Happy Days." Tom began his role as the famous Mr. C the father of Richie and Joanie Cunningham, he was always the supportive,understanding ,kind go to for advice role model on the show. He was liked and respected by his former cast members and will be greatly missed by many.

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So, a somewhat snarky friend of mine commented - mom died, dad died - the nanny better watch out. Tony Danza, god is watching you!

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So, a somewhat snarky friend of mine commented - mom died, dad died - the nanny better watch out. Tony Danza, god is watching you!


It probably wouldn't hurt to add Fran Drescher to that list as well.....just to be safe.

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So, a somewhat snarky friend of mine commented - mom died, dad died - the nanny better watch out. Tony Danza, god is watching you!


It probably wouldn't hurt to add Fran Drescher to that list as well.....just to be safe.

He (my friend) actually wanted to know if Alice was still alive- I think not but couldn't remember for sure.....

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Happy Days tv dad Tom Bosley has died at age 83.

Tom Bosley has passed away at the age of 83 in his Palm Springs California home from complications of a staph infection.

Tom Bosley first started his acting career in 1963 when he co starred with screen beauty Natalie Wood in the classic film "Love With A Proper Stranger." Tom Bosely is best known as his long running role as Howard Cunningham on the comedy show 'Happy Days."

Tom began his role as the famous Mr. C the father of Richie and Joanie Cunningham, he was always the supportive,understanding ,kind go to for advice role model on the show. He was liked and respected by his former cast members and will be greatly missed by many.



I forgot he was in Love With a Proper Stranger! He was so endearing as the nice guy/blind date she rejects. You almost rooted for him.

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Mom, dad and now the King of Smut... "Penthouse founder and controversial US businessman Bob Guccione has died after a long battle with cancer, aged 79. He courted controversy, and built up an empire around Penthouse magazine, launched in 1969. But a series of poor investments and the advent of internet pornography saw his company General Media go brankrupt in 2003"

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So, a somewhat snarky friend of mine commented - mom died, dad died - the nanny better watch out. Tony Danza, god is watching you!


It probably wouldn't hurt to add Fran Drescher to that list as well.....just to be safe.

He (my friend) actually wanted to know if Alice was still alive- I think not but couldn't remember for sure.....


According to IMDB she is -- she was born in 1926

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Jill Clayburgh passed away a few days ago at the age of 66. Always liked the lady - very classy. I had no idea she had been dealing with leukemia for the last 20 years or so. My sympathies to her family.

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Leslie Nielsen Dies :(
21 minutes ago by TMZ Staff

Legendary funny man Leslie Nielsen died today of complications of pneumonia in a hospital near his home in Fort Lauderdale, this according to his agent. He was 84.

His agent tells TMZ Nielsen passed surrounded by his wife and friends at about 5:34 PM ET.

Nielsen was best known for his roles in "Airplane" and the "Naked Gun" series. His "Airplane" co-star, Barbara Billingsley, passed away last month.

Ted Striker: Surely you can't be serious.
Rumack: I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

Elaine Dickinson: A hospital? What is it?
Rumack: It's a big building with patients, but that's not important right now.



RIP Frank Drebin...

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Legendary funny man Leslie Nielsen died today



Noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!

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And this is number 2?


'Empire Strikes Back' director Kershner dies in LA


PARIS (AFP) – US director Irvin Kershner, renowned for making the second Star Wars film, "The Empire Strikes Back", has died in Los Angeles, his goddaughter Adriana Santini told AFP on Monday. He was 87 years old.

Kershner, who besides the 1980 sci-fi epic also directed Sean Connery as James Bond in "Never Say Never Again" (1983) and Peter Weller in "Robocop II" (1990), died at home after a long illness, said Santini, who lives in France.

Born in Philadelphia in 1923, Kershner trained as a musician and in photography before starting making documentaries and then feature films.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20101129/ennew...eusfilmdirector

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Elizabeth Edwards Dies at Age 61»


Elizabeth Edwards died Tuesday after a six-year battle with breast cancer, The Associated Press and ABC News reported. She was 61.

On Monday her family announced that Edwards, who was briefly hospitalized over the Thanksgiving holiday, had stopped all cancer treatment.

She had been resting at home surrounded by family and friends.

Edwards, the estranged wife of John Edwards, the former North Carolina senator and one-time presidential candidate, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2004.
She recently wrote a message on her Facebook page that would end up being a farewell.

"You all know that I have been sustained throughout my life by three saving graces – my family, my friends, and a faith in the power of resilience and hope," she wrote. "These graces have carried me through difficult times and they have brought more joy to the good times than I ever could have imagined."

"Today we have lost the comfort of Elizabeth's presence but she remains the heart of this family," her family said in a statement. "We love her and will never know anyone more inspiring or full of life. On behalf of Elizabeth we want to express our gratitude to the thousands of kindred spirits who moved and inspired her along the way. Your support and prayers touched our entire family."

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Elizabeth Edwards Dies at Age 61»


Elizabeth Edwards died Tuesday after a six-year battle with breast cancer, The Associated Press and ABC News reported. She was 61.

On Monday her family announced that Edwards, who was briefly hospitalized over the Thanksgiving holiday, had stopped all cancer treatment.

She had been resting at home surrounded by family and friends.

Edwards, the estranged wife of John Edwards, the former North Carolina senator and one-time presidential candidate, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2004.
She recently wrote a message on her Facebook page that would end up being a farewell.

"You all know that I have been sustained throughout my life by three saving graces – my family, my friends, and a faith in the power of resilience and hope," she wrote. "These graces have carried me through difficult times and they have brought more joy to the good times than I ever could have imagined."

"Today we have lost the comfort of Elizabeth's presence but she remains the heart of this family," her family said in a statement. "We love her and will never know anyone more inspiring or full of life. On behalf of Elizabeth we want to express our gratitude to the thousands of kindred spirits who moved and inspired her along the way. Your support and prayers touched our entire family."



Rest in peace Elizabeth. Her youngest two children are only 10 and 12. I was told by a breastfriend (who had lost her own mother to breast cancer at the age of 7) that the loss of your Mom is not a Cinderella tale. May God bless your children and give them peace and strength.

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Director Blake Edwards dies in Southern California


LOS ANGELES – Blake Edwards, the director and writer known for clever dialogue, poignance and occasional belly-laugh sight gags in "Breakfast at Tiffany's," "10" and the "Pink Panther" farces, is dead at age 88.

Edwards died from complications of pneumonia at about 10:30 p.m. Wednesday at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, said publicist Gene Schwam. Blake's wife, Julie Andrews, and other family members were at his side. He had been hospitalized for about two weeks.

Edwards had knee problems, had undergone unsuccessful procedures and was "pretty much confined to a wheelchair for the last year-and-a-half or two," Schwam said. That may have contributed to his condition, he added.

At the time of his death, Edwards was working on two Broadway musicals, one based on the "Pink Panther" movies. The other, "Big Rosemary," was to be an original comedy set during Prohibition, Schwam said.

"His heart was as big as his talent. He was an Academy Award winner in all respects," said Schwam, who knew him for 40 years.

A third-generation filmmaker, Edwards was praised for evoking classic performances from Jack Lemmon, Audrey Hepburn, Peter Sellers, Dudley Moore, Lee Remick and Andrews, his wife of nearly half a century.

He directed and often wrote a wide variety of movies including "Days of Wine and Roses," a harrowing story of alcoholism; "The Great Race," a comedy-adventure that starred Lemmon, Tony Curtis and Natalie Wood; and "Victor/Victoria," his gender-bender musical comedy with Andrews.

He was also known for an independent spirit that brought clashes with studio bosses. He vented his disdain for the Hollywood system in his 1981 black comedy, "S.O.B."

"I was certainly getting back at some of the producers of my life," he once remarked, "although I was a good deal less scathing than I could have been. The only way I got to make it was because of the huge success of `10,' and even then they tried to sabotage it."

Because many of his films were studded with farcical situations, reviewers often criticized his work. "In Mr. Edward's comic world, noses are to be stung, heads to have hangovers, and beautiful women to be pursued at any cost," wrote The New York Times' Vincent Canby in a review of "10." Gary Arnold of the Washington Post added: "Edwards seems to take two dumb steps for every smart one. ... He can't seem to resist the most miserable sight gags that occur to him."

However, Richard Schickel wrote in Time magazine: "When director Edwards is at his best, there is something bracing, and in these days, unique about his comedy. ... He really wants to save the world by showing how stupid some of its creatures can be."

Although many of Edwards' films were solid hits, he was nominated for Academy Awards only twice, in 1982 for writing the adapted screenplay of "Victor/Victoria" and in 1983 for co-writing "The Man Who Loved Women." Lemmon and Remick won Oscar nominations in 1962 for "Days of Wine and Roses," and Hepburn was nominated for "Breakfast at Tiffany's" in 1961.

The motion picture academy selected Edwards to receive a lifetime achievement award in 2004 for "his writing, directing and producing an extraordinary body of work for the screen."

When he collected the award, he jokingly referred to his wife: "My mother thanks you, my father thanks you, and the beautiful English broad with the incomparable soprano and promiscuous vocabulary thanks you."

Edwards had entered television in 1958, creating "Peter Gunn," which established a new style of hard-edged detective series. The tone was set by Henry Mancini's pulsating theme music. Starring Craig Stevens, the series ran until 1961 and resulted in a 1967 feature movie "Gunn."

"Peter Gunn" marked the beginning of a fruitful collaboration between Edwards and Mancini, who composed melodic scores and songs for most of Edwards' films. Mancini won Academy Awards for the score of "Breakfast at Tiffany's" and the song "Moon River," the title song of "Days of Wine and Roses" and the score of "Victor/Victoria."

The Edwards family history extended virtually the entire length of American motion pictures. J. Gordon Edwards was a pioneering director of silent films, including more than 20 with the exotic vamp Theda Bara. His son, Jack McEdwards (the family name), became a top assistant director and production manager in Hollywood.

William Blake McEdwards was born July 26, 1922, in Tulsa, Okla. The family moved to Hollywood three years later, and the boy grew up on his father's movie sets.

Edwards began in films as an actor, playing small roles in such movies as "A Guy Named Joe" and "Ten Gentlemen From West Point." After 18 months in the Coast Guard in World War II, he returned to acting but soon realized he lacked the talent. With John Champion, he wrote a Western, "Panhandle," which he produced and acted in for the quickie studio, Monogram. He followed with "Stampede."

In 1947, Edwards turned to radio and created the hard-boiled "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" for Dick Powell; it was converted to television in 1957, starring Powell with Mary Tyler Moore as his secretary, whose face is never seen on-screen.

Tiring of the TV grind, Edwards returned to films and directed his first feature, "Bring Your Smile Along." After a few more B movies which he usually co-wrote, he made the big time in 1958 with "The Perfect Furlough," starring Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh, and "Operation Petticoat" with Cary Grant and Curtis.

"Breakfast at Tiffany's" in 1961 established Edwards as a stylish director who could combine comedy with bittersweet romance. His next two films proved his versatility: the suspenseful "Experiment in Terror" (1962) and "Days of Wine and Roses" (1963), the story of a couple's alcoholism, with Lemmon in his first dramatic role.

"The Great Race," about an auto race in the early 1900s, marked Edwards' first attempt at a big-budget spectacle. He spent Warner Bros.' money lavishly, raising the ire of studio boss Jack Warner. The 1965 release proved a modest success.

Edwards' disdain for the studios reached a peak in the 1970 "Darling Lili," a World War I romance starring his new wife, Andrews, and Rock Hudson. The long, expensive Paris location infuriated the Paramount bosses. The movie flopped, continuing Andrews' decline from her position as Hollywood's No. 1 star.

For a decade, Edwards' only hits were "Pink Panther" sequels. Then came "10," which he also produced and wrote. The sex comedy became a box-office winner, creating a new star in Bo Derek and restoring the director's reputation. He scored again in 1982 with "Victor/Victoria," with Andrews playing a woman who poses as a (male) female impersonator. His later films became more personal, particularly the 1986 "That's Life," which he wrote with his psychiatrist.

After Sellers' death in 1980, Edwards attempted to keep the "Pink Panther" franchise alive. He wrote and directed "Curse of the Pink Panther" in 1983 and "Son of the Pink Panther" in 1993 but both were failed efforts.

A 2006 remake of the original with Steve Martin as Clouseau was modestly successful; its 2009 follow up was less so. Both had new directors, with Edwards credited as a writer.

He continued to supervise Andrews' career, which included a short-lived television series and her 1996 return to Broadway in a $8.5 million version of "Victor/Victoria." Edwards directed the show, which drew mixed reviews. When Andrews was the only one connected with the musical to be nominated for a Tony, she announced to a matinee audience that she was declining the nomination because her co-workers had been snubbed.

Andrews and Edwards married in 1968. She had a daughter, Emma, from her marriage to Broadway designer Tony Walton. Edwards had a daughter, Jennifer, and a son, Geoffrey, from his marriage to Patricia Edwards. He and Andrews adopted two Vietnamese children, Amy and Jo.

A longtime painter, Edwards began sculpting in mid-life, and his bronze works in the style of Henry Moore drew critical praise in shows in Los Angeles and Bucks County, Pa.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101216/ap_en_...t_blake_edwards

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Steve Landesberg: 1945 - 2010
21 hours ago | IMDb News

Steve Landesberg, best known to television audiences as Det. Sgt. Arthur Dietrich on the '70s sitcom "Barney Miller," died today following a long battle with cancer. He was 65 years old.

Landesberg joined the regular cast of "Barney Miller" in its second season, distinguishing Dietrich from the rest of the Greenwich Village police station's motley crew of detectives by making him the intellectual straight man and a likable know-it-all. Although movie buffs may recognize Landesberg from his recent appearance in Forgetting Sarah Marshall, in which he played Peter Bretter's pediatrician, the veteran character actor portrayed Dietrich on the classic ABC sitcom until the end of the series' run in 1982. Landesberg even reprised the role for the short-lived "Barney Miller" spinoff "Fish," a vehicle for fellow castmember Abe Vigoda.

Born November 23, 1945, in New York, NY, Landesberg's father owned a grocery store, and his mother was a milliner. Landesberg started out in show business doing stand-up, and he also performed with an improvisational group called The New York Stickball Team.

After "Barney Miller" went off the air, the actor did extensive voice-over work, as well as making numerous guest appearances on a variety of television series including "The Golden Girls," "Seinfeld,""Everybody Hates Chris," and a featured guest appearance in an episode of A&E's "The Cleaner." His most recent regular role was Dr. Myron Finkelstein on the Starz original comedy "Head Case," for which he co-wrote seven episodes.

Landesberg is also credited with the quote "Honesty is the best policy, but insanity is a better defense."
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I always loved this guy no matter what he appeared in. :(

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Steve Landesberg: 1945 - 2010
21 hours ago | IMDb News

Steve Landesberg, best known to television audiences as Det. Sgt. Arthur Dietrich on the '70s sitcom "Barney Miller," died today following a long battle with cancer. He was 65 years old.

Landesberg joined the regular cast of "Barney Miller" in its second season, distinguishing Dietrich from the rest of the Greenwich Village police station's motley crew of detectives by making him the intellectual straight man and a likable know-it-all. Although movie buffs may recognize Landesberg from his recent appearance in Forgetting Sarah Marshall, in which he played Peter Bretter's pediatrician, the veteran character actor portrayed Dietrich on the classic ABC sitcom until the end of the series' run in 1982. Landesberg even reprised the role for the short-lived "Barney Miller" spinoff "Fish," a vehicle for fellow castmember Abe Vigoda.

Born November 23, 1945, in New York, NY, Landesberg's father owned a grocery store, and his mother was a milliner. Landesberg started out in show business doing stand-up, and he also performed with an improvisational group called The New York Stickball Team.

After "Barney Miller" went off the air, the actor did extensive voice-over work, as well as making numerous guest appearances on a variety of television series including "The Golden Girls," "Seinfeld,""Everybody Hates Chris," and a featured guest appearance in an episode of A&E's "The Cleaner." His most recent regular role was Dr. Myron Finkelstein on the Starz original comedy "Head Case," for which he co-wrote seven episodes.

Landesberg is also credited with the quote "Honesty is the best policy, but insanity is a better defense."
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I always loved this guy no matter what he appeared in. :(


He will be missed.

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