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i don't know if i've read historicals...that term befuddles me. does in the company of the courtesan count as one? if so - i've read it and it was great.

 

anyway, i just finished foucault's pendulum. anyone ever slog through that? good lord what a book.

I had to read that in college and it almost killed me -_- I really like Umberto Eco in theory but man he is hard for me to get through

Edited by soho2chelsea

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Yeah, Foucault's Pendulum made my brain sweat! It's a good book but definitely a challenge.

 

In regards Wicked--I had mixed emotions about it. On the one hand, it wasn't the book I wanted it to be--it wasn't a fun, easy, fanciful read. Instead, it's alternately political and poetic. (Son of a Witch is much more of a pop book than Wicked and I think it's the influence of the softened Broadway show. The Broadway show reworked the book to put the Girl Power angle front and center, making it a story of sisterhood rather than the diversity of points the author covers in the novel.) I've read the author's other books for adults (he's done takes on Snow White, Cinderella, and an original novel that plays with Dickens) and they're of the same sort--not the most fun books, but still, interesting. The success of Wicked apparently was the grounds for all of these re-takes; before Wicked, all of his books were kids' literature, I think.

 

I just finished Lost and Found by Carolyn Parkhurst (or Pankhurst?) It is about an "Amazing Race"-style TV show, and each chapter is from the viewpoint of a participant on the show. It was okay--Just from the title, you can guess there's going to be a fluffy emotional journey involved. Also, the author seems to lean really hard on sex and sexuality issues in this book (e.g., one of the teams is a wife and hubby who are Christians who claim to have been redeemed from homosexuality). By the time the book closed, I felt like the story had just skimmed over the top of the plot material, that it could have been a much richer, more rewarding ride. (Besides, as a reality TV fan, I loved the show aspect of the book!)

 

If you want really fun books to read, one of the members of my literary hall of fame would be Terry Pratchett. He's a British writer and you can find his books in the US under sci-fi/fantasy. You might be leery of a fantasy world, thinking, "Oh, Lord, it's Dungeons and Dragons!" but what Pratchett does is take real-world issues, set them in a hysterical parody world centered on a fantasy version of London, and send them up for mockery. He has *tons* of characters, including Death (one of my favorites--Death is great lover of humanity!), a well-meaning but inept bunch of cops, a bawdy witch whose favorite song is "The Hedgehog Can't Be Buggered," and so on. (Just from that song alone, you get a sense of TP's humor.) Plus, what's really fun about TP is that he weaves into his books all sorts of cultural references/word play jokes. When TP's "on," his books are really killer. You have to read a couple to really appreciate TP's world, though, so if they don't grab you from the start, keep reading!

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Yeah, Foucault's Pendulum made my brain sweat! It's a good book but definitely a challenge.

 

In regards Wicked--I had mixed emotions about it. On the one hand, it wasn't the book I wanted it to be--it wasn't a fun, easy, fanciful read. Instead, it's alternately political and poetic. (Son of a Witch is much more of a pop book than Wicked and I think it's the influence of the softened Broadway show. The Broadway show reworked the book to put the Girl Power angle front and center, making it a story of sisterhood rather than the diversity of points the author covers in the novel.) I've read the author's other books for adults (he's done takes on Snow White, Cinderella, and an original novel that plays with Dickens) and they're of the same sort--not the most fun books, but still, interesting. The success of Wicked apparently was the grounds for all of these re-takes; before Wicked, all of his books were kids' literature, I think.

 

I just finished Lost and Found by Carolyn Parkhurst (or Pankhurst?) It is about an "Amazing Race"-style TV show, and each chapter is from the viewpoint of a participant on the show. It was okay--Just from the title, you can guess there's going to be a fluffy emotional journey involved. Also, the author seems to lean really hard on sex and sexuality issues in this book (e.g., one of the teams is a wife and hubby who are Christians who claim to have been redeemed from homosexuality). By the time the book closed, I felt like the story had just skimmed over the top of the plot material, that it could have been a much richer, more rewarding ride. (Besides, as a reality TV fan, I loved the show aspect of the book!)

 

If you want really fun books to read, one of the members of my literary hall of fame would be Terry Pratchett. He's a British writer and you can find his books in the US under sci-fi/fantasy. You might be leery of a fantasy world, thinking, "Oh, Lord, it's Dungeons and Dragons!" but what Pratchett does is take real-world issues, set them in a hysterical parody world centered on a fantasy version of London, and send them up for mockery. He has *tons* of characters, including Death (one of my favorites--Death is great lover of humanity!), a well-meaning but inept bunch of cops, a bawdy witch whose favorite song is "The Hedgehog Can't Be Buggered," and so on. (Just from that song alone, you get a sense of TP's humor.) Plus, what's really fun about TP is that he weaves into his books all sorts of cultural references/word play jokes. When TP's "on," his books are really killer. You have to read a couple to really appreciate TP's world, though, so if they don't grab you from the start, keep reading!

I've been curious about Pratchett's books. Do they have to be read in order?..he has so many. If they can be read out of sequence..any faves?

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You can get a lot of information about Terry Pratchett here: L-Space, a site that was spun off years ago from conversations between TP and his fans on UseNet. (In his last book, he actually had tributes to some of his old friends from the Net.) Just FYI, he's often referred to on that site by his userID, PTerry.

 

This is a text version of the L-Space reading guide to the majority of his works, those set in his fantasy land, the Discworld: Terry Pratchett reading guide. You don't have to read all of the books, or read them in chronological order to generally get the idea of what's going on. It's easier to just dive in under a character group you might like, reading those books in chronological order, and then go exploring through the books as you like.

 

I myself started with the books on the witches, because I wanted to read and understand what was going on in the Phantom send-up, Maskerade; that book involved the witch characters. But I especially recommend the books that involve the Watch, the lowly city cops, since they tend to be more accessible to the lay reader, I think.

 

The 'Watch' Series

---------------

Guards! Guards!**

Men At Arms**

Feet Of Clay**

Jingo**

The Fifth Elephant

Night Watch**

Monstrous Regiment* (minor element)

Thud

 

(One of those ** books I read during a rehab from surgery; I'd laugh till I hurt myself, take a breath, then read again, just because I was so hooked. I think it was Jingo, but I'm not sure.)

 

You can look over the main ideas parodied for all Discworld books in this article from Wikipedia: Discworld on Wikipedia. The Death books are also great--the Hogfather, a book about Christmas, is especially a riot. Death's mighty steed is named Binky, a detail that makes me giggle every time the horse appears in the text.

 

You can also step outside Terry Pratchett's usual fare, the Discworld, and read his book he co-wrote with Neil Gaiman, Good Omens. It's about a devil and an angel who have been locked in eternal battle, and now that Apocolypse is at hand (back in the day when cars had cassette players), they're just not really feeling like ending the universe and all that negative stuff. This book is *hysterical*, and I heard it was to be made into a major film--no idea if that's the truth or not.

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Just got done with Skinny Dip by Carl Hiaasen. It's a fun read with lots of subplots and characters intertwined without knowing they're connected. It starts out with a louse throwing his wife overboard on their honeymoon cruise who learns too late that she didn't die but came back to screw his life up royally ~ and she succeeds. Lots of humor ~ easy read ~ great for summer and the beach or while you're on a plane. They have the book at Costco ~ my fave book store. :unsure: Whenever it says New York Times bestseller on the cover, I almost always enjoy the book.

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Just finished "Cabinet of Curiosities" (oops my bad from an earlier post..by the writing team of Preston/Child)....very creepy and an interesting moral dilemma proposed.Has anyone read "Kane and Abel" older book by Jeffrey Archer? How is Archer as a writer? I've never read his books.

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You guys read vampire novels. What are the Laurell K Hamilton books like? Are they really explicit? :unsure: for the most part I like to use my imagination also are they really violent/gory as far at the vampire/neck stuff? I see she has a new book coming out and was wanting to get the scoop on her style of writing.

They are very explicit sexually. I've heard people say that the first six or so are really good...fabulous...but because of a plot device, the latter ones start to become more sex than anything else. I haven't read them all myself, but I have heard this from many people.

 

They are pretty gory as far as violence goes, as well, from my understanding.

 

Hope this helps. Lots of people really love the books; if you were going to try one, I'd start with Guilty Pleasures, which is the first Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter book.

 

Sorry for the late post. Thanks for the info :) I'm thinking it's not my cup of tea.

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You guys read vampire novels. What are the Laurell K Hamilton books like? Are they really explicit? :unsure: for the most part I like to use my imagination also are they really violent/gory as far at the vampire/neck stuff? I see she has a new book coming out and was wanting to get the scoop on her style of writing.

They are very explicit sexually. I've heard people say that the first six or so are really good...fabulous...but because of a plot device, the latter ones start to become more sex than anything else. I haven't read them all myself, but I have heard this from many people.

 

They are pretty gory as far as violence goes, as well, from my understanding.

 

Hope this helps. Lots of people really love the books; if you were going to try one, I'd start with Guilty Pleasures, which is the first Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter book.

 

Sorry for the late post. Thanks for the info :) I'm thinking it's not my cup of tea.

 

If you want a good vampire read that's not gory, you could try Charlaine Harris's books. They are set in the American South and although I haven't read them, i've heard great things about them (I have the first one on my shelf).

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You guys read vampire novels. What are the Laurell K Hamilton books like? Are they really explicit? :unsure: for the most part I like to use my imagination also are they really violent/gory as far at the vampire/neck stuff? I see she has a new book coming out and was wanting to get the scoop on her style of writing.

They are very explicit sexually. I've heard people say that the first six or so are really good...fabulous...but because of a plot device, the latter ones start to become more sex than anything else. I haven't read them all myself, but I have heard this from many people.

 

They are pretty gory as far as violence goes, as well, from my understanding.

 

Hope this helps. Lots of people really love the books; if you were going to try one, I'd start with Guilty Pleasures, which is the first Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter book.

 

Sorry for the late post. Thanks for the info :) I'm thinking it's not my cup of tea.

 

If you want a good vampire read that's not gory, you could try Charlaine Harris's books. They are set in the American South and although I haven't read them, i've heard great things about them (I have the first one on my shelf).

 

I looked at that series on Amazon..great reviews (also looks like HBO might pick it up as a series). Those seem more to my liking. I'm writing it down on my list. Thanks for the suggestion :)

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I'm reading "Marley and Me." I've had it for a long time, but after having to have one of my pets put to sleep, couldn't handle reading it for quite a while. Finally started last night - my husband actually kicked me out of bed for laughing so much and keeping him awake. Even when I managed to muffle the laughter, the whole bed was shaking. For anyone who loves animals and has ever had a dog who doesn't quite fit the label of well-behaved, this is a great read. I'm staring at my version of Marley right now - he is laying back on one of the deck chairs like a sunbather. :unsure:

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I'm reading "Marley and Me." I've had it for a long time, but after having to have one of my pets put to sleep, couldn't handle reading it for quite a while. Finally started last night - my husband actually kicked me out of bed for laughing so much and keeping him awake. Even when I managed to muffle the laughter, the whole bed was shaking. For anyone who loves animals and has ever had a dog who doesn't quite fit the label of well-behaved, this is a great read. I'm staring at my version of Marley right now - he is laying back on one of the deck chairs like a sunbather. :unsure:

SOunds like something my husband would love. I'll check it out.

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Finished "A Sight for Sore Eyes" by Ruth Rendell. The author takes her time setting up the characters..very creepy. I had never read her before.

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I never could read the Anne Rice Vampire books! I read the witch series, and that's it for her stuff. Well, I LOVE the erotica she wrote under pseudonyms!! But I couldn't even get one chapter into Interview with a Vampire (and I can and have been known to read ANYTHING)

Same here!But I did like the Mayfair witches series.Loved Buffy- still sorry that show ended. I really adored Spike, but am not into vampire novels much (although the Charlaine Harris series about Sookie Stackhouse is fun).But the rest..eh.I'm one who didn't care for The Historian; it was very atmospheric, but it didn't make sense to me.Caleb Carr's The Alienist was better, imo.

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Boy, nsmallaz, nothing in these 9 pages we've written so far has appealed to you?? :D What kinds of twists and turns? A mystery? Or just a complicated plot?

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I am looking for a good book to read. I am looking for story with twists and turns. Any suggestions?

Do you read crime thriller/mystery type books? I'm not sure if read mass market type writers. John Sanford "Prey" books are exellent (Rules of Prey is the first). Karen Slaughter's series (Blindsighted is the first) and Tess Gerritsen's series (The Surgeon is the first) are very good. I also enjoy James Patterson. I know people complain that he is total lightweight but I love his Alex Cross leading man. The Cross book are super fast reads. Have you tried any of them? They can be graphic type books not sure if you read those (Funny these type books don't bother me but horror vampire books..I can't handle :D).

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I am looking for a good book to read. I am looking for story with twists and turns. Any suggestions?

Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child write some great thrillers!(Avoid the books they write separately; they are at their best when they team up!)Try Riptide.It's got everything: a sympathetic hero, a beautiful heroine, a great villain, a hunt for pirate treasue...it's fantastic!

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i'm reading black swan green - anyone into david mitchell?? i LOVE him.

I LOVED "Cloud Atlas" but didn't enjoy "Number 9 Dream" so much. Is "Black Swan Green" good? Maybe I'll have to check it out.

 

i really enjoyed black swan green. i reviewed it on my site (link here) if you want to read about it a little more. i've never read number 9 dream - by reading the back of the book i could kinda tell i wouldn't be into it. i've also read ghostwritten (which i also reviewed), which was in the same vein as cloud atlas, and i really enjoyed that too.

 

i'm so glad there's another mitchell fan around!

Edited by fykeylicious

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Thanks for the link!

 

I totally hated the poetry in "Possession" too. Enjoyed the rest of the book, but ugh, had start skipping over the poetry after a while. Actually, the ending was pretty annoying too (I see you agree).

 

If "Ghostwritten" is similar to "Cloud Atlas," I'll definitely check it out.

 

Off to go read more of your reviews...seems we have similar taste...

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Ok, still going through your reviews...The way you felt about "Foucault's Pendulum" is the way I feel about Rushdie. In a desire to feel like a big smartypants (ha ha) and understand what the fuss was about, I read "The Satanic Verses." I totally didn't get it and I felt dumb. Sure, I appreciated the story, but when it came time to understanding why it was so offensive, I was lost. I felt like I needed to go read the Koran and learn some history. I tried to read "Midnight's Children" to get back in the swing of things, but I got bored and gave up after about 100 pages.I just read your review of "Haunted." I read "Diary" by him about a month ago. It was certainly disturbing. I swear, he has the most effed up characters. Not great literature by any means, but it made for an entertaining read while sitting at the airport.Haha, just read your "Parallel Worlds" review. Haven't read it, but just have to say I had the same childhood goal and disappointing realization. I still love astronomy though! Have you read "The Elegant Universe" by Brian Greene? He's Mr. trendy string theorist and narrator of the excellent NOVA miniseries of the same name.Ah, Murakami. He's one of those authors I haven't read, but I keep almostbuying his books. One of my friends works for Zoetrope and keeps bugging me to read his short stories.

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Ok, still going through your reviews...

 

The way you felt about "Foucault's Pendulum" is the way I feel about Rushdie. In a desire to feel like a big smartypants (ha ha) and understand what the fuss was about, I read "The Satanic Verses." I totally didn't get it and I felt dumb. Sure, I appreciated the story, but when it came time to understanding why it was so offensive, I was lost. I felt like I needed to go read the Koran and learn some history. I tried to read "Midnight's Children" to get back in the swing of things, but I got bored and gave up after about 100 pages.

 

I just read your review of "Haunted." I read "Diary" by him about a month ago. It was certainly disturbing. I swear, he has the most effed up characters. Not great literature by any means, but it made for an entertaining read while sitting at the airport.

 

Haha, just read your "Parallel Worlds" review. Haven't read it, but just have to say I had the same childhood goal and disappointing realization. I still love astronomy though! Have you read "The Elegant Universe" by Brian Greene? He's Mr. trendy string theorist and narrator of the excellent NOVA miniseries of the same name.

 

Ah, Murakami. He's one of those authors I haven't read, but I keep almostbuying his books. One of my friends works for Zoetrope and keeps bugging me to read his short stories.

thanks, i'm glad you're enjoying it!

 

i did read the satanic verses but that was before i started my blog, so i haven't reviewed it. i basically thought it was *okay* but didn't fall off my chair for it or anything. i just wanted to see what all the hype was about. i think the reason it was offensive was b/c of that part where it implies the prophet was not speaking to the angel gabriel but rather satan impersonating him - and if that were the case, a lot of islam would be negated. but it was still just a story, sheesh. the shifting narration really made it too much work for me.

 

but definitely check out ghostwritten - some of the characters from cloud atlas make an appearance - and one appears in black swan green too.

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In regards Wicked--I had mixed emotions about it. On the one hand, it wasn't the book I wanted it to be--it wasn't a fun, easy, fanciful read. Instead, it's alternately political and poetic.

I felt the same way. I couldn't get through it. I have a very short attention span with books :) I will read both "deeper" books and frivolous books, but if I get one when I'm expecting the other, I get cranky.

 

Of the "deeper thought" books, a favorite of mine that I am reading again that might appeal to some of you is Dostoevsky's (even though I can never spell him) Notes From Underground. Shorter than Crime & Punishment and even more evil. I recommend. ;)

 

If anyone here writes, I also HIGHLY recommend Stephen King's "On Writing" which I am also reading again right now. Great book even if you don't write (mostly a colorful and touching retelling of a lot of King's life), and practically magical if you do.

Edited by soho2chelsea

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