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#21 Desertdreaming

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 05:38 PM

Elizabeth Edwards Dies at Age 61


Elizabeth Edwards died Tuesday after a six-year battle with breast cancer, The Associated Press and ABC News reported. She was 61.

On Monday her family announced that Edwards, who was briefly hospitalized over the Thanksgiving holiday, had stopped all cancer treatment.

She had been resting at home surrounded by family and friends.

Edwards, the estranged wife of John Edwards, the former North Carolina senator and one-time presidential candidate, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2004.
She recently wrote a message on her Facebook page that would end up being a farewell.

"You all know that I have been sustained throughout my life by three saving graces my family, my friends, and a faith in the power of resilience and hope," she wrote. "These graces have carried me through difficult times and they have brought more joy to the good times than I ever could have imagined."

"Today we have lost the comfort of Elizabeth's presence but she remains the heart of this family," her family said in a statement. "We love her and will never know anyone more inspiring or full of life. On behalf of Elizabeth we want to express our gratitude to the thousands of kindred spirits who moved and inspired her along the way. Your support and prayers touched our entire family."
- Breast Cancer Survivor - Since 1999 -

#22 Desertdreaming

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 05:50 PM

Elizabeth Edwards Dies at Age 61


Elizabeth Edwards died Tuesday after a six-year battle with breast cancer, The Associated Press and ABC News reported. She was 61.

On Monday her family announced that Edwards, who was briefly hospitalized over the Thanksgiving holiday, had stopped all cancer treatment.

She had been resting at home surrounded by family and friends.

Edwards, the estranged wife of John Edwards, the former North Carolina senator and one-time presidential candidate, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2004.
She recently wrote a message on her Facebook page that would end up being a farewell.

"You all know that I have been sustained throughout my life by three saving graces my family, my friends, and a faith in the power of resilience and hope," she wrote. "These graces have carried me through difficult times and they have brought more joy to the good times than I ever could have imagined."

"Today we have lost the comfort of Elizabeth's presence but she remains the heart of this family," her family said in a statement. "We love her and will never know anyone more inspiring or full of life. On behalf of Elizabeth we want to express our gratitude to the thousands of kindred spirits who moved and inspired her along the way. Your support and prayers touched our entire family."



Rest in peace Elizabeth. Her youngest two children are only 10 and 12. I was told by a breastfriend (who had lost her own mother to breast cancer at the age of 7) that the loss of your Mom is not a Cinderella tale. May God bless your children and give them peace and strength.
- Breast Cancer Survivor - Since 1999 -

#23 galaxygirl

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Posted 16 December 2010 - 10:45 AM

Director Blake Edwards dies in Southern California


LOS ANGELES Blake Edwards, the director and writer known for clever dialogue, poignance and occasional belly-laugh sight gags in "Breakfast at Tiffany's," "10" and the "Pink Panther" farces, is dead at age 88.

Edwards died from complications of pneumonia at about 10:30 p.m. Wednesday at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, said publicist Gene Schwam. Blake's wife, Julie Andrews, and other family members were at his side. He had been hospitalized for about two weeks.

Edwards had knee problems, had undergone unsuccessful procedures and was "pretty much confined to a wheelchair for the last year-and-a-half or two," Schwam said. That may have contributed to his condition, he added.

At the time of his death, Edwards was working on two Broadway musicals, one based on the "Pink Panther" movies. The other, "Big Rosemary," was to be an original comedy set during Prohibition, Schwam said.

"His heart was as big as his talent. He was an Academy Award winner in all respects," said Schwam, who knew him for 40 years.

A third-generation filmmaker, Edwards was praised for evoking classic performances from Jack Lemmon, Audrey Hepburn, Peter Sellers, Dudley Moore, Lee Remick and Andrews, his wife of nearly half a century.

He directed and often wrote a wide variety of movies including "Days of Wine and Roses," a harrowing story of alcoholism; "The Great Race," a comedy-adventure that starred Lemmon, Tony Curtis and Natalie Wood; and "Victor/Victoria," his gender-bender musical comedy with Andrews.

He was also known for an independent spirit that brought clashes with studio bosses. He vented his disdain for the Hollywood system in his 1981 black comedy, "S.O.B."

"I was certainly getting back at some of the producers of my life," he once remarked, "although I was a good deal less scathing than I could have been. The only way I got to make it was because of the huge success of `10,' and even then they tried to sabotage it."

Because many of his films were studded with farcical situations, reviewers often criticized his work. "In Mr. Edward's comic world, noses are to be stung, heads to have hangovers, and beautiful women to be pursued at any cost," wrote The New York Times' Vincent Canby in a review of "10." Gary Arnold of the Washington Post added: "Edwards seems to take two dumb steps for every smart one. ... He can't seem to resist the most miserable sight gags that occur to him."

However, Richard Schickel wrote in Time magazine: "When director Edwards is at his best, there is something bracing, and in these days, unique about his comedy. ... He really wants to save the world by showing how stupid some of its creatures can be."

Although many of Edwards' films were solid hits, he was nominated for Academy Awards only twice, in 1982 for writing the adapted screenplay of "Victor/Victoria" and in 1983 for co-writing "The Man Who Loved Women." Lemmon and Remick won Oscar nominations in 1962 for "Days of Wine and Roses," and Hepburn was nominated for "Breakfast at Tiffany's" in 1961.

The motion picture academy selected Edwards to receive a lifetime achievement award in 2004 for "his writing, directing and producing an extraordinary body of work for the screen."

When he collected the award, he jokingly referred to his wife: "My mother thanks you, my father thanks you, and the beautiful English broad with the incomparable soprano and promiscuous vocabulary thanks you."

Edwards had entered television in 1958, creating "Peter Gunn," which established a new style of hard-edged detective series. The tone was set by Henry Mancini's pulsating theme music. Starring Craig Stevens, the series ran until 1961 and resulted in a 1967 feature movie "Gunn."

"Peter Gunn" marked the beginning of a fruitful collaboration between Edwards and Mancini, who composed melodic scores and songs for most of Edwards' films. Mancini won Academy Awards for the score of "Breakfast at Tiffany's" and the song "Moon River," the title song of "Days of Wine and Roses" and the score of "Victor/Victoria."

The Edwards family history extended virtually the entire length of American motion pictures. J. Gordon Edwards was a pioneering director of silent films, including more than 20 with the exotic vamp Theda Bara. His son, Jack McEdwards (the family name), became a top assistant director and production manager in Hollywood.

William Blake McEdwards was born July 26, 1922, in Tulsa, Okla. The family moved to Hollywood three years later, and the boy grew up on his father's movie sets.

Edwards began in films as an actor, playing small roles in such movies as "A Guy Named Joe" and "Ten Gentlemen From West Point." After 18 months in the Coast Guard in World War II, he returned to acting but soon realized he lacked the talent. With John Champion, he wrote a Western, "Panhandle," which he produced and acted in for the quickie studio, Monogram. He followed with "Stampede."

In 1947, Edwards turned to radio and created the hard-boiled "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" for Dick Powell; it was converted to television in 1957, starring Powell with Mary Tyler Moore as his secretary, whose face is never seen on-screen.

Tiring of the TV grind, Edwards returned to films and directed his first feature, "Bring Your Smile Along." After a few more B movies which he usually co-wrote, he made the big time in 1958 with "The Perfect Furlough," starring Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh, and "Operation Petticoat" with Cary Grant and Curtis.

"Breakfast at Tiffany's" in 1961 established Edwards as a stylish director who could combine comedy with bittersweet romance. His next two films proved his versatility: the suspenseful "Experiment in Terror" (1962) and "Days of Wine and Roses" (1963), the story of a couple's alcoholism, with Lemmon in his first dramatic role.

"The Great Race," about an auto race in the early 1900s, marked Edwards' first attempt at a big-budget spectacle. He spent Warner Bros.' money lavishly, raising the ire of studio boss Jack Warner. The 1965 release proved a modest success.

Edwards' disdain for the studios reached a peak in the 1970 "Darling Lili," a World War I romance starring his new wife, Andrews, and Rock Hudson. The long, expensive Paris location infuriated the Paramount bosses. The movie flopped, continuing Andrews' decline from her position as Hollywood's No. 1 star.

For a decade, Edwards' only hits were "Pink Panther" sequels. Then came "10," which he also produced and wrote. The sex comedy became a box-office winner, creating a new star in Bo Derek and restoring the director's reputation. He scored again in 1982 with "Victor/Victoria," with Andrews playing a woman who poses as a (male) female impersonator. His later films became more personal, particularly the 1986 "That's Life," which he wrote with his psychiatrist.

After Sellers' death in 1980, Edwards attempted to keep the "Pink Panther" franchise alive. He wrote and directed "Curse of the Pink Panther" in 1983 and "Son of the Pink Panther" in 1993 but both were failed efforts.

A 2006 remake of the original with Steve Martin as Clouseau was modestly successful; its 2009 follow up was less so. Both had new directors, with Edwards credited as a writer.

He continued to supervise Andrews' career, which included a short-lived television series and her 1996 return to Broadway in a $8.5 million version of "Victor/Victoria." Edwards directed the show, which drew mixed reviews. When Andrews was the only one connected with the musical to be nominated for a Tony, she announced to a matinee audience that she was declining the nomination because her co-workers had been snubbed.

Andrews and Edwards married in 1968. She had a daughter, Emma, from her marriage to Broadway designer Tony Walton. Edwards had a daughter, Jennifer, and a son, Geoffrey, from his marriage to Patricia Edwards. He and Andrews adopted two Vietnamese children, Amy and Jo.

A longtime painter, Edwards began sculpting in mid-life, and his bronze works in the style of Henry Moore drew critical praise in shows in Los Angeles and Bucks County, Pa.

http://news.yahoo.co...t_blake_edwards
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#24 kappy22

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Posted 21 December 2010 - 05:42 PM

Steve Landesberg: 1945 - 2010
21 hours ago | IMDb News

Steve Landesberg, best known to television audiences as Det. Sgt. Arthur Dietrich on the '70s sitcom "Barney Miller," died today following a long battle with cancer. He was 65 years old.

Landesberg joined the regular cast of "Barney Miller" in its second season, distinguishing Dietrich from the rest of the Greenwich Village police station's motley crew of detectives by making him the intellectual straight man and a likable know-it-all. Although movie buffs may recognize Landesberg from his recent appearance in Forgetting Sarah Marshall, in which he played Peter Bretter's pediatrician, the veteran character actor portrayed Dietrich on the classic ABC sitcom until the end of the series' run in 1982. Landesberg even reprised the role for the short-lived "Barney Miller" spinoff "Fish," a vehicle for fellow castmember Abe Vigoda.

Born November 23, 1945, in New York, NY, Landesberg's father owned a grocery store, and his mother was a milliner. Landesberg started out in show business doing stand-up, and he also performed with an improvisational group called The New York Stickball Team.

After "Barney Miller" went off the air, the actor did extensive voice-over work, as well as making numerous guest appearances on a variety of television series including "The Golden Girls," "Seinfeld,""Everybody Hates Chris," and a featured guest appearance in an episode of A&E's "The Cleaner." His most recent regular role was Dr. Myron Finkelstein on the Starz original comedy "Head Case," for which he co-wrote seven episodes.

Landesberg is also credited with the quote "Honesty is the best policy, but insanity is a better defense."
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I always loved this guy no matter what he appeared in. :(

#25 sueli

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Posted 21 December 2010 - 09:04 PM

Steve Landesberg: 1945 - 2010
21 hours ago | IMDb News

Steve Landesberg, best known to television audiences as Det. Sgt. Arthur Dietrich on the '70s sitcom "Barney Miller," died today following a long battle with cancer. He was 65 years old.

Landesberg joined the regular cast of "Barney Miller" in its second season, distinguishing Dietrich from the rest of the Greenwich Village police station's motley crew of detectives by making him the intellectual straight man and a likable know-it-all. Although movie buffs may recognize Landesberg from his recent appearance in Forgetting Sarah Marshall, in which he played Peter Bretter's pediatrician, the veteran character actor portrayed Dietrich on the classic ABC sitcom until the end of the series' run in 1982. Landesberg even reprised the role for the short-lived "Barney Miller" spinoff "Fish," a vehicle for fellow castmember Abe Vigoda.

Born November 23, 1945, in New York, NY, Landesberg's father owned a grocery store, and his mother was a milliner. Landesberg started out in show business doing stand-up, and he also performed with an improvisational group called The New York Stickball Team.

After "Barney Miller" went off the air, the actor did extensive voice-over work, as well as making numerous guest appearances on a variety of television series including "The Golden Girls," "Seinfeld,""Everybody Hates Chris," and a featured guest appearance in an episode of A&E's "The Cleaner." His most recent regular role was Dr. Myron Finkelstein on the Starz original comedy "Head Case," for which he co-wrote seven episodes.

Landesberg is also credited with the quote "Honesty is the best policy, but insanity is a better defense."
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I always loved this guy no matter what he appeared in. :(


He will be missed.

#26 socrates171

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Posted 22 December 2010 - 02:49 PM

http://www.spin.com/...efheart-dies-69

#27 sanlee

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 06:19 PM

R.I.P Teena Marie.
**MY INNER CHILD IS A MEAN LITTLE EFFER**

#28 Hihomumio

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 10:59 PM

source


Anne Francis dies at 80; costarred in the 1950s science-fiction classic 'Forbidden Planet'


By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times

January 3, 2011



Anne Francis, who costarred in the 1950s science-fiction classic "Forbidden Planet" and later played the title role in "Honey West," the mid-1960s TV series about a sexy female private detective with a pet ocelot, died Sunday. She was 80.

Francis, who was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2007 and underwent surgery and chemotherapy, died of complications of pancreatic cancer at a retirement home in Santa Barbara, said Jane Uemura, her daughter. Friends and family members were with her, said a family spokeswoman, Melissa Fitch.

A shapely blond with a signature beauty mark next to her lower lip, Francis was a former child model and radio actress when she first came to notice on the big screen in the early 1950s.

She had leading or supporting roles in more than 30 movies, including "Bad Day at Black Rock," "Battle Cry," "Blackboard Jungle," "The Hired Gun," "Don't Go Near the Water," "Brainstorm," "Funny Girl" and "Hook, Line and Sinker."'

She also achieved cult status as one of the stars of "Forbidden Planet," the 1956 MGM movie costarring Walter Pidgeon and Leslie Nielsen and featuring a helpful robot named Robby.

Francis, however, never became a major movie star and was more frequently seen on television as a guest star on scores of series from the late '50s and decades beyond, including an episode of "The Twilight Zone" in which she played a department store mannequin who comes to life at night.

But it's as the star of "Honey West," the first female detective to be featured in a weekly TV series, that Francis may be best remembered.

Based on the title character in G.G. Fickling's series of Honey West paperback mysteries launched in 1957, Francis' Honey West was introduced to TV viewers in an episode of "Burke's Law" in the spring of 1965.

The episode served as the pilot for the half-hour "Honey West" series, which was executive produced by Aaron Spelling and made its debut in the fall of 1965.

In it, West, who inherited a Los Angeles detective agency from her late father, had a partner named Sam Bolt (played by John Ericson), shared an apartment with her Aunt Meg (Irene Hervey) and owned a man-hating pet ocelot named Bruce Biteabit.

In what Francis later described as "a tongue-in-cheek, female James Bond," her karate-chopping private eye drove a custom-built Cobra convertible sports car and, when necessary, worked out of a specially equipped mobile surveillance van that masqueraded as a TV service vehicle.

Among her Bond-style gimmicks: a lipstick radio transmitter, a fake martini olive on a toothpick for bugging conversations, earrings that exploded with tear gas when they were thrown to the floor and a black garter with pink lace that doubled as a gas mask.

As the glamorous and sexy Honey, Francis was outfitted in an eye-catching wardrobe that included a black snakeskin trench coat, a white beaded gown trimmed in sable and a tiger-skin bathing suit with matching cape.

In a television era of Donna Reed and Harriet Nelson housewives, the independent, take-charge Honey West has been described as being a role model for young baby-boomer women.

"She was probably the forerunner of what we would call the good aspects of female independence," Francis told the (Memphis) Commercial Appeal in 1997.

"Producers and writers I work with, young women in their 30s and 40s, tell me all the time, 'You have no idea what an influence you had on me with Honey West. You showed that I could do something unusual with my life, that I could have my freedom and not be dependent on another human being for my livelihood.'"

Francis won a Golden Globe as best female TV star and received an Emmy nomination for her portrayal of Honey West.

The series received good ratings, but ABC canceled it in 1966 after 30 episodes. "They were able to buy 'The Avengers' [spy drama] from England for less than it cost to produce our show," Francis later said.

She was born Sept. 16, 1930, in Ossining, N.Y. At the age of 7, after her family moved to New York City, she was signed by the John Robert Powers modeling agency.

Her career as a child model led to acting roles on the children's radio shows "Let's Pretend" and "Coast-to-Coast on a Bus," and she then moved on to radio soap operas. In 1941, she also appeared on Broadway, playing Gertrude Lawrence as a child in "Lady in the Dark."

Francis arrived in Hollywood for the first time in 1946 and was signed to a contract with MGM. But after a year of "grooming" at the studio, during which she had a small part in the Mickey Rooney musical "Summer Holiday," the teenage Francis returned to New York, where she began appearing in live TV productions.

After playing a teenage prostitute with a baby in a girl's reform school in "So Young, So Bad," a 1950 movie drama shot in New York, Francis was signed to a contract at 20th Century Fox. After three years at Fox, she was signed again at MGM and by the late '50s was freelancing.

While at MGM, she co-starred in "Forbidden Planet," a big-budget, box-office hit that received an Oscar nomination for special effects.

Francis played Altaira, the alluring daughter of the scientist character played by Pidgeon: the two sole-surviving human inhabitants of the mysterious, technologically advanced planet.

"I got that part because I was under contract to MGM and I had good legs," Francis, who wore futuristically abbreviated costumes, said in a 1992 interview for Starlog magazine.

At the time, she recalled, "I don't think that any of us really were aware of the fact that it was going to turn into a longtime cult film, probably much, much stronger today than it was then. 'Forbidden Planet' just had a life of its own, something that none of us was aware was going to happen."

Francis, who wrote the 1982 memoir "Voices From Home: An Inner Journey," continued to appear on television throughout the '90s.

In addition to Uemura, the twice-divorced Francis is survived by another daughter, Maggie, and a grandson, Fitch said.

dennis.mclellan@latimes.com




I was quite young but I do remember watching Honey West.

#29 Kath

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 07:02 AM

Celebrated British actor Pete Postlethwaite has died.

The 64-year-old passed away in a hospital in central England on Sunday, longtime friend Andrew Richardson told England's Press Association.

Postlethwaite had been battling cancer, he said.

The award-winning thespian had appeared in movies and television shows for years, but gained international fame as Mr. Kobayashi in 1995's "The Usual Suspects."

He followed the role with praised performances in numerous films, including "Brassed Off," "Romeo + Juliet" and "The Shipping News." He most recently appeared in last year's "Inception," "Clash of the Titans" and "The Town."

Director Steven Spielberg called Postlethwaite "the best actor in the world," and cast him in two of his movies in the 1990s, "The Lost World" and "Amistad."

In 1992, Postlethwaite was nominated for an Oscar for his performance opposite Daniel Day Lewis in "In the Name of the Father." He received the Order of the British Empire in 2004.

msheridan@nydailynews.com;


Read more: http://www.nydailyne...l#ixzz19z7Q0XZj

#30 ollysmum

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 08:22 AM

Really sad about Pete Postlethwaite. The guy was a legend. R.I.P :(
MY INNER CHILD IS A MEAN LITTLE FUCKER

#31 KikiTopaz

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 07:18 PM

Do we have Zsa Zsa Gabor on the death watch?

#32 Cruzin2Fold

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 01:57 PM

Do we have Zsa Zsa Gabor on the death watch?

She is on my personal deadpool.
Men fall in love with Gilda and then they wake up with me

#33 kappy22

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 10:05 AM

From AP reports"

LONDON British actress Susannah York, one of the leading stars of British and Hollywood films in the late 1960s and early 1970s, has died in London. She was 72.York received an Oscar nomination in 1970 for her role in "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" and also appeared in the classic "A Man For All Seasons" before going on to play Christopher Reeve's biological mother in the Superman series of movies.

She died of cancer Saturday at the Royal Marsden Hospital in London. Her son, the actor Orlando Wells, said York was an incredibly brave woman who did not complain about her illness and a "truly wonderful mother." He said she went into the hospital on Jan. 6 after experiencing shoulder pain.

York had a long, distinguished career on film, television and on stage, but she is best remembered for her early roles, when she had an immediate impact that started with her 1963 role as Albert Finney's love interest in the memorable period piece romp "Tom Jones."

With its tongue-in-cheek sensuality and gentle send-up of the British aristocracy, the film is remembered as an early landmark in 1960s cinema, and York's unmistakable presence added to its appeal. Her long blond hair, stunning blue eyes and quick-witted repartee brought her a string of excellent roles.

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I always mixed her up with Julie Christie not just because they looked similar but because I always liked them both in their roles and how they handled themselves.


#34 Hihomumio

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 09:03 PM

Fitness guru Jack LaLanne dies at 96
By the CNN Wires Staff

(CNN) -- American fitness guru Jack LaLanne died Sunday afternoon at his home in Morro Bay, California, according to his long-time agent, Rick Hersh. He was 96.

The cause, said Hersh, was respiratory failure due to pneumonia. LaLanne had been ill for the past week. His wife, Elaine, was at his side, along with his family and friends, Hersh said. No funeral arrangements were announced, but his agent said plans were being made.

LaLanne spent decades talking about the healthful benefits of exercise and fitness. He opened his own health spa in California in 1936, years before the fitness craze swept the United States. LaLanne even designed the world's first leg-extension machine, along with several other pieces of fitness equipment now standard in the fitness industry.

He was born in San Francisco on September 26, 1914. A self-confessed sugar- and junk-food addict as a child, he went on to study bodybuilding and weight-lifting by the time he was in his late teens.

From the 1950s through the 1980s, LaLanne performed multiple feats of strength and endurance. His first such stunt was an underwater swim the length of the Golden Gate Bridge, loaded with 140 pounds of equipment, in 1954. He went on to stage many attention-getting events, including completing over a thousand pushups in a little over 20 minutes, and towing 65 boats filled with thousands of pounds of wood pulp in Japan.

LaLanne had his own workout program, "The Jack LaLanne Show." First broadcast nationally in 1959, the show went on to run for three decades.

In his later years, he was easily recognized because of late-night infomercials on on the benefits of juicing.

He also made many appearances on CNN's "Larry King Live" and was a friend of the talk show host. "There was no one like Jack LaLanne," King said Sunday night. "He would go on forever ... a true guru. I guess Charles Atlas from the old comic books would be the predecessor for Jack LaLanne."

But it wasn't simply LaLanne's physical prowess that impressed King. "Elderly people were encouraged by him because he just kept on going," King said, adding that modern fitness celebrities owe a debt of gratitude to the original impresario of exercise.

LaLanne's wife of 51 years released a statement on her husband's passing: "I have not only lost my husband and a great American icon, but the best friend and most loving partner anyone could ever hope for," Elaine said.

CNN's Chuck Johnston contributed to this report



Find this article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2...it.jack.lalanne

#35 fykeylicious

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Posted 08 March 2011 - 04:23 PM

R.I.P. 'Celeb Rehab' Rocker Mike Starr Dead

Former Alice in Chains bassist Mike Starr died in Utah ... TMZ has learned.

Starr appeared on the third season of "Celebrity Rehab" back in 2009 -- and was arrested last month for felony possession of a controlled substance. Salt Lake City cops say he had 6 Xanax pills and 6 Opana (painkiller) pills when he was busted.

Starr was 44 years old.

Mike's dad tells TMZ, "It's a terrible shock and tragedy."

UPDATE: Police tell us Starr's body was found in a Salt Lake City home today. Cops say they were called to the house at 1:42PM.

Story developing...


source: TMZ

#36 dixiedoodah

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 05:19 AM

Elizabeth Taylor dead at 79 By the CNN Wire Staff March 23, 2011 9:11 a.m. EDT STORY HIGHLIGHTS Taylor died in Los Angeles' Cedars-Sinai hospital She was famous for her beauty and many marriages Los Angeles (CNN) -- Elizabeth Taylor, the legendary actress famed for her beauty, her jet-set lifestyle, her charitable endeavors and her many marriages, has died, her publicist told CNN Wednesday. She was 79. Taylor died "peacefully today in Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles," said a statement from her publicist. She was hospitalized six weeks ago with congestive heart failure, "a condition with which she had struggled for many years. Though she had recently suffered a number of complications, her condition had stabilized and it was hoped that she would be able to return home. Sadly, this was not to be." Though a two-time Oscar winner -- for "Butterfield 8" (1960) and "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf" (1966) -- Taylor was more celebrated for simply being Elizabeth Taylor: sexy, glamorous, tempestuous, fragile, always trailing courtiers, media and fans. She wasn't above playing to that image -- she had a fragrance called "White Diamonds" -- or mocking it. "I am a very committed wife," she once said. "And I should be committed too -- for being married so many times."

Edited by dixiedoodah, 23 March 2011 - 05:22 AM.


#37 Hoyaheel

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 06:53 AM

So sad- she'd been sick for so long, you never really thought she'd actually *die* though! I hope AMC does a retrospective of her films this weekend - there are some I haven't seen and many I haven't seen in ages....

#38 KikiTopaz

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Posted 23 March 2011 - 02:40 PM

Love Elizabeth Taylor. She fascinated me as Cleopatra, with her awesome costumes and make-up. I think I was six years old. It's hard to believe she started out as a child star and made it that long in Hollywood. I'll bet she knew a story or two. God Bless her. I was a big fan.

#39 BobbyD

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Posted 18 May 2011 - 05:16 PM

Jeff Conaway in a coma after apparent OD
Former 'Taxi' star 'is unresponsive at this time,' rep says
E!online

updated 1 hour 18 minutes ago 2011-05-18T23:55:46
Another sad turn of events for a former Celebrity Rehab patient.

..Jeff Conaway is in critical condition at an Encino hospital after an apparent overdose, the actor's rep confirmed to E! News Wednesday.

"He is in a coma and unresponsive at this time," said manager Phil Brock.

Family members have been in and out of the hospital waiting for news, Brock said, adding, "He turned his head two days ago, but nothing since."

There is no word on whether or not doctors expect Conaway to wake up.

The former "Taxi" star, who also played bad-boy Kenickie in "Grease," has been plagued by health problems in recent years, including a bad fall a year ago that occurred when he was under the influence of methadone and OxyContin.

..There is no word on what he may have OD'd on today.

He left "Taxi" in 1982 and worked in television throughout the 1980s and '90s, including a starring stint on "Babylon 5."

In 2008, Conaway joined "Celebrity Rehab," where he opened up about his longtime addictions to cocaine, painkillers and alcohol.

2011 E! Entertainment Television, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Bobbyd - Noun - Poster of FanChitChat. Posts are often labeled as Jerkish or Boorish. Not a Fan-i-cus of Celebri-ti-cus. Enemy of the Superfan. SNARKER. Dickus.Assholicus. Terrorized by bullies, popular kids, jocks, in High School.

#40 fykeylicious

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Posted 19 May 2011 - 01:42 AM

just can't feel bad for this dude




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